Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Drake, R. E., Essock, S. M., Shaner, A., Carey, K. B., Minkoff, K., Kola, L., & Rickards, L. (2001). Implementing dual diagnosis services for clients with severe mental illness.. Psychiatric Services, 52 (4), 469-476.
Title:  Implementing dual diagnosis services for clients with severe mental illness.
Authors:  Drake, R. E., Essock, S. M., Shaner, A., Carey, K. B., Minkoff, K., Kola, L., & Rickards, L.
Year:  2001
Journal/Publication:  Psychiatric Services
Publisher:  American Psychiatric Association
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.52.4.469
Full text:  http://ps.psychiatryonline.org/doi/abs/10.1176/appi.ps.52.4.469   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Not reported

Structured abstract:

Background:  Dual diagnosis programs can be effective if they combine mental health and substance abuse interventions tailored for the complicated needs of clients with comorbid disorders. Some components of effective programs are critical, including comprehensive, long-term, staged approach to recovery; assertive outreach; motivational interventions; help for clients to acquire skills and supports to manage both illnesses and to pursue functional goals; and cultural sensitivity and competence. While many state mental health systems have implemented dual diagnosis services, high quality services are rare.
Purpose:  The authors provide an overview of the numerous barriers to implementation of high quality mental health services and describe implementation strategies to overcome the barriers.
Findings:  In order to implement dual diagnosis programs, organizational and financial changes must be made at the policy level. In addition, clarifying the program mission with structural changes to support dual diagnosis services, training and supervision for clinicians, and dissemination of accurate information to consumers and families to support understanding, demand, and advocacy are also key.

Disabilities served:  Alcohol and drug abuse
Chronic mental illness
Populations served:  Rural and remote communities
Persons with multiple disabilities (e.g., deaf-blindness, HIV/AIDS, substance abuse)
Interventions:  Psychological counseling