Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Wright, T.; Wehman, P.; McDonough, J.; Thomas, K.; Ochrach, C.; Brooke, A.; Goodwin, Jr., J.C.; Ham, W.; & Junod, P. (2020). Charity-Oriented Versus Human ResourceOriented Perspectives: Investigating Staff Understandings of Employment Practices for Persons With Disabilities. Journal of Applied Rehabilitation Counseling, 51 (2), In Press.
Title:  Charity-Oriented Versus Human ResourceOriented Perspectives: Investigating Staff Understandings of Employment Practices for Persons With Disabilities
Authors:  Wright, T.; Wehman, P.; McDonough, J.; Thomas, K.; Ochrach, C.; Brooke, A.; Goodwin, Jr., J.C.; Ham, W.; & Junod, P.
Year:  2020
Journal/Publication:  Journal of Applied Rehabilitation Counseling
Publisher:  Springer
Full text:  PDF   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Not reported

Structured abstract:

Background:  According to 2019 U.S. Labor Department statistics, persons with disabilities have a much lower employment rate (20.8%) than persons without disabilities (69.2%). Recently, researchers conducted in-depth interviews with 63 staff members, managers, and employment specialists from a large organization that has exhibited a high quality of hiring and supporting individuals with disabilities to gain an understanding of their individual views of disability and hiring practices. What they found was that there were differences in their understandings, motivations, rationales, support strategies, and concerns in regards to the employment of persons with disabilities. Understanding these differences and internalizations is important in the enhancement, expansion of opportunities, and employment support for persons with disabilities.

Disabilities served:  Autism / ASD
Blindness
Cerebral palsy
Chronic mental illness
Cognitive / intellectual impairment
Deafness
Developmental disabilities
Down syndrome
Multiple sclerosis
Spinal cord injury (SCI)
Traumatic brain injury (TBI)
Severe physical disability
Multiple disabilities
Populations served:  Rural and remote communities
Transition-age youth (14 - 24)
Culturally diverse populations (e.g., African Americans, Native Americans, and non-English speaking populations)
Persons with multiple disabilities (e.g., deaf-blindness, HIV/AIDS, substance abuse)
SSI and SSDI recipients
Sub-minimum wage employees
Interventions:  Accommodations
Assistive technology
Co-worker supports
On-the-job training and support
Online training
Supported employment
Training and technical assistance
Vocational rehabilitation
Transition services
Outreach and orientation
Outcomes:  Employment acquisition
Full-time employment