Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Hartman, E.; Schlegelmilch, A.; Roskowski, M.; Anderson, C.; & Tansey, T. (2019). Early findings from the Wisconsin PROMISE project: Implications for policy and practice. Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, 51 (2), 167-181.
Title:  Early findings from the Wisconsin PROMISE project: Implications for policy and practice
Authors:  Hartman, E.; Schlegelmilch, A.; Roskowski, M.; Anderson, C.; & Tansey, T.
Year:  2019
Journal/Publication:  Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation
Publisher:  IOS Press
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.3233/JVR-191036
Full text:  https://content.iospress.com/articles/journal-of-vocational-rehabil...   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Not reported

Structured abstract:

Background:  Promoting the Readiness of Minors in Supplemental Security Income (PROMISE) is a U.S. Department of Education federal demonstration grant in collaboration with Health and Human Services, Labor, and the Social Security Administration. Wisconsin PROMISE is one of six model demonstration sites.
Purpose:  Through state inter-agency collaboration, the Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation implemented Wisconsin PROMISE coordinated services and supports to youth with disabilities receiving supplemental security income (SSI) benefits and their families to improve education and career and financial self-sufficiency outcomes.
Data collection and analysis:  Wisconsin PROMISE enrolled 2,024 youth with disabilities receiving SSI benefits and their families who were randomly assigned to usual services or PROMISE services.
Findings:  Early data indicates positive results regarding engagement, employment, and earnings outcomes. Wisconsin PROMISE youth employment rates went from 1% in 2013 to 67% in 2018, 10-percentage points higher than observed with the control group.
Conclusions:  An overview of early findings from the Wisconsin PROMISE project site related to VR engagement, employment, and earnings outcomes of youth and family participants provides lessons learned that can be applied to VR practice.

Disabilities served:  Multiple disabilities
Populations served:  Transition-age youth (14 - 24)
SSI and SSDI recipients
Interventions:  Transition services
Outcomes:  Employment acquisition
Full-time employment