Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Kaya, C., Chan, F., Rumrill, P., Hartman, E., Wehman, P., Iwanaga, K., Pai, C., & Avellone, L. (2016). Vocational rehabilitation services and competitive employment for transition-age youth with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, 45 (1), 73-83.
Title:  Vocational rehabilitation services and competitive employment for transition-age youth with autism spectrum disorders
Authors:  Kaya, C., Chan, F., Rumrill, P., Hartman, E., Wehman, P., Iwanaga, K., Pai, C., & Avellone, L.
Year:  2016
Journal/Publication:  Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation
Publisher:  IOS Press
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.3233/JVR-160812
Full text:  https://content.iospress.com/articles/journal-of-vocational-rehabil...    |   PDF   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  No

Structured abstract:

Purpose:  This study investigated the extent to which demographic characteristics, Social Security disability benefits, and vocational rehabilitation (VR) services influence competitive employment outcomes for transition-age youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD).
Data collection and analysis:  The Rehabilitation Services Administration’s Case Service Reports (RSA-911) database for Fiscal Year 2011 was examined using a purposeful selection multivariate logistic regression analysis.
Findings:  Results indicated that participants who received on-the-job support, job placement services, rehabilitation technology, occupational/vocational training, other services, job search assistance, vocational counseling and guidance, and job readiness training from the state-federal VR program were significantly more likely to achieve competitive employment than were participants who did not receive those services. In addition, higher levels of educational attainment, receiving a greater number of VR services, and not receiving Social Security disability benefits were positively associated with competitive employment outcomes. In contrast to findings reported in other studies of VR participants with ASD, gender was not associated with competitive employment outcomes.
Conclusions:  Overall, the number and type of VR services had more influence on competitive employment than did demographic variables or Social Security disability benefits.

Disabilities served:  Autism / ASD
Populations served:  Transition-age youth (14 - 24)
Interventions:  Vocational rehabilitation
Outcomes:  Employment acquisition
Full-time employment
Part-time employment