Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Crudden, Adele; Giesen, J. Martin; Sui, Zhen (2018). Contrasting competitively employed and unemployed VR applicants with visual disabilities: Characteristics and VR service delivery patterns. Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, 49 (1), 117-126.
Title:  Contrasting competitively employed and unemployed VR applicants with visual disabilities: Characteristics and VR service delivery patterns
Authors:  Crudden, Adele; Giesen, J. Martin; Sui, Zhen
Year:  2018
Journal/Publication:  Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation
Publisher:  IOS Press
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.3233/JVR-180958
Full text:  https://content.iospress.com/articles/journal-of-vocational-rehabil...   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Yes

Structured abstract:

Background:  Approximately one-third of the working age population of persons with visual disabilities is employed. Recent federal legislation stressed the importance of VR services to assist employed persons with disabilities retain or advance in employment, but we know little about employed VR applicants.
Purpose:  This study sought to identify and contrast characteristics and services received by VR consumers with visual disabilities based on employment status at application.
Data collection and analysis:  VR cases from fiscal year 2015 were analyzed using logistic regression. The sample included 4,586 competitively employed applicants and 9,643 unemployed applicants.
Findings:  Competitively employed applicants tended to be White non-Hispanic, older, more educated, and less likely to have non-cognitive disabilities. Competitively employed applicants tended to receive on-the-job supports, rehabilitation technology, counseling and guidance, technical assistance, and diagnosis and treatment.
Conclusions:  Competitively employed applicants with visual disabilities have different characteristics and service patterns from unemployed applicants. VR counselors can anticipate applicants’ service delivery needs based on their employment status while considering individual goals and circumstances. Future research regarding job retention for competitively employed applicants who are blind or have low vision appears warranted.

Disabilities served:  Blindness
Visual impairment
Interventions:  Compensatory strategies
Vocational rehabilitation