Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Shorey, R.C.; Martino, S.; Lamb, K.E.; LaRowe, S.D.; Santa Ana, E.J. (2014). Change talk and relatedness in group motivational interviewing: a pilot study. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 51 75-81.
Title:  Change talk and relatedness in group motivational interviewing: a pilot study
Authors:  Shorey, R.C.; Martino, S.; Lamb, K.E.; LaRowe, S.D.; Santa Ana, E.J.
Year:  2014
Journal/Publication:  Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment
Publisher:  Elsevier
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsat.2014.11.003
Full text:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25488505   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Yes

Structured abstract:

Background:  Change talk is defined as client speech that favors change. It is also a hypothesized mechanism action in motivational interviewing (MI) for substance abuse disorders. The primary treatment modality for most of the clients seeking treatment for substance abuse is group-based treatment. However, limited research has been done to examine group MI among this population. And no study has been done to look at change talk within group MI. The authors of this article explore standard change talk, such as desire, ability, reason and need, and a phenomenon involving change talk, which the authors termed ‘relatedness.’
Data collection and analysis:  Data was used from an ongoing randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluating the effectiveness of group MI related to a treatment control condition (TCC) among U.S. veteran outpatients with a primary alcohol use disorder at a Veterans Affairs hospital. A subsample of participants (n = 52) from the RCT were randomly assigned to receive GMI or TCC. The majority of participants in the subsample had co-existing psychiatric (88%) and dual diagnosis drug use disorders (38%). Two of four treatment sessions were coded by trained raters for CT and relatedness.
Findings:  CT and relatedness occurred with greater frequency in GMI compared to TCC, with effect sizes in the large range for each difference. Results held after controlling for number of group members in treatment sessions.
Conclusions:  Findings suggest that GMI is associated with more frequent CT and relatedness than TCC, consistent with the broader literature demonstrating the influence of MI on CT.

Disabilities served:  Alcohol and drug abuse
Interventions:  Motivational interviewing