Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  D'Amico, E.J.; Houck, J.M.; Hunter, S.B.; Miles, J.N.; Osilla, K.C.; Ewing, B.A. (2014). Group motivational interviewing for adolescents: change talk and alcohol and marijuana outcomes.. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 83 (1), 68-80.
Title:  Group motivational interviewing for adolescents: change talk and alcohol and marijuana outcomes.
Authors:  D'Amico, E.J.; Houck, J.M.; Hunter, S.B.; Miles, J.N.; Osilla, K.C.; Ewing, B.A.
Year:  2014
Journal/Publication:  Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Publisher:  American Psychological Association
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1037/a0038155
Full text:  http://psycnet.apa.org/fulltext/2014-45102-001.html   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Yes

Structured abstract:

Purpose:  How to determine what is ineffective and effective group intervention tactics has not quite been established. However, motivational interviewing could be a positive intervention step for adolescent alcohol and other drug use. But the system for group MI has not been explored yet. A possible mechanism is called change talk, when a client argues for change. The current study talks about the group process in group MI for adolescents and the effects of group change talk on individuals’ alcohol and marijuana outcomes.
Data collection and analysis:  The authors analyzed 129 group session audio recordings from a randomized clinical trial of adolescent group MI. Sequential coding was performed with the Motivational Interviewing Skill Code (MISC) and the CASAA Application for Coding Treatment Interactions software application. Outcomes included past-month intentions, frequency, and consequences of alcohol and marijuana use; motivation to change; and positive expectancies.
Findings:  Sequential analysis indicated that facilitator open-ended questions and reflections of change talk increased group change talk. Group change talk was then followed by more change talk. Multilevel models accounting for rolling group enrollment revealed group change talk was associated with decreased alcohol intentions, alcohol use, and heavy drinking 3 months later; group sustain talk was associated with decreased motivation to change, increased intentions to use marijuana, and increased positive alcohol and marijuana expectancies.
Conclusions:  Facilitator speech and peer responses each had effects on change and sustain talk in the group setting, which were then associated with individual changes. Selective reflection of change talk in adolescent group MI is suggested as a strategy to manage group dynamics and increase behavioral change.

Disabilities served:  Alcohol and drug abuse
Populations served:  Other
Interventions:  Motivational interviewing