Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Chan, Fong; Rumrill, Phillip D. (2016). Improving the employment outcomes of individuals with traumatic brain injury: The effectiveness of knowledge translation strategies to impact the use of evidence-based practices by vocational rehabilitation counselors. Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, 45 (1), 107-115.
Title:  Improving the employment outcomes of individuals with traumatic brain injury: The effectiveness of knowledge translation strategies to impact the use of evidence-based practices by vocational rehabilitation counselors
Authors:  Chan, Fong; Rumrill, Phillip D.
Year:  2016
Journal/Publication:  Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation
Publisher:  IOS Press
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.3233/JVR-160815
Full text:  https://content.iospress.com/articles/journal-of-vocational-rehabil...   
Peer-reviewed?  No
NIDILRR-funded?  Yes

Structured abstract:

Background:  The objective of this study was to compare the effects of two knowledge translation (KT) strategies on the knowledge and future actions of vocational rehabilitation (VR) counselors when supporting individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI).
Study sample:  Participants were professional staff recruited from a single state VR agency who volunteered to participate in the study. The majority were female counselors with Master’s degrees.
Data collection and analysis:  Participants were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Both groups received the same information on supported employment for individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) over a three month period. One group received the information via pre-recorded video presentations that were posted on an unlisted YouTube channel. The second group received the identical information via three briefs. At the beginning of each of the three months, each participant received either an email with the link to a pre-recorded presentation on YouTube or an email with the brief attached depending on the group assignment. The information could be accessed at their convenience across the one month period. Participants were assessed pre- and post-intervention with a Likert-scale instrument designed to measure knowledge of TBI, the effects of TBI on employment, and the efficacy of the supported employment approach for this group. In addition, participants were asked pre- and posttest how likely they were to fund services related to supported employment for individuals with TBI.
Findings:  Knowledge increased for both groups from baseline to post intervention. No significant group differences were found between the two interventions. However there were changes in perceptions of funding employment activities, barriers to employment, and number of Status 26 closures.
Conclusions:  While the study did not identify the most effective means of delivering information to VR counselors, implications for future research are discussed.

Disabilities served:  Traumatic brain injury (TBI)
Interventions:  Supported employment
Vocational rehabilitation