Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Mueller, V., Peebles, M.C., Chui, C., Iwanaga, K., Tang, X., Brooks, J., Eagle, D., Chan, F. (0). Association of Employment and Health and Well-Being in People with Fibromyalgia. Journal of Rehabilitation, 83 (3), 37-43.
Title:  Association of Employment and Health and Well-Being in People with Fibromyalgia
Authors:  Mueller, V., Peebles, M.C., Chui, C., Iwanaga, K., Tang, X., Brooks, J., Eagle, D., Chan, F.
Year:  0
Journal/Publication:  Journal of Rehabilitation
Publisher:  National Rehabilitation Association
Full text:  http://web.a.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=0&sid=3352...    |   PDF   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Yes
Research design:  Survey research

Structured abstract:

Background:  Fibromyalgia is a Musculoskeletal chronic pain disorder that causes widespread pain, muscular tenderness, and a depressed mood. It affects over 4 million Americans, and makes it much harder for those who have it to keep a job and stay mentally healthy.
Purpose:  The goal of the study was to see if a person with fibromyalgia's state of employment had any effect on their other health-related outcomes or perceived quality of life.
Setting:  The selected participants were obtained via emails sent out via the National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association. .
Study sample:  The sample consisted of 198 working age (25-54) adults with fibromyalgia. 98% of the sample were women, with the average age being 43, and the average age of FM onset being 28. 89.9% of the participants described themselves as being Caucasian, 1.5% were African American, 5.1% were Hispanic or Latino, 1% were Native American, and 2.5% were other. 68% were married or cohabitating, and 45.3% had a college education.
Data collection and analysis:  The data was collected via a survey that asked information about the person's pain, disability, secondary health conditions, quality of life, depression, social support, and life satisfaction.
Findings:  It was found that the employment status did not affect pain, but it lowered functional disability scores, secondary health conditions, and depression while raising quality of life, social supports, and life satisfaction.
Conclusions:  The evidence supports the idea that working-age adults with FM will find greater satisfaction and better mental health when they work

Disabilities served:  Chronic pain