Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Leslie M.,Kinyanjui B,Bishop M.,Rumrill, P.D., and Roessler, R.T. (2015). Patterns in workplace accommodations for people with multiple sclerosis to overcome cognitive and other disease-related limitations. NeuroRehabilitation, 37 (3), 425–436.
Title:  Patterns in workplace accommodations for people with multiple sclerosis to overcome cognitive and other disease-related limitations
Authors:  Leslie M.,Kinyanjui B,Bishop M.,Rumrill, P.D., and Roessler, R.T.
Year:  2015
Journal/Publication:  NeuroRehabilitation
Publisher:  IOS Press
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.3233/NRE-151271
Full text:  http://content.iospress.com/articles/neurorehabilitation/nre1271    |   PDF   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  No
Research design:  Survey research

Structured abstract:

Background:  Cognitive impairments caused by Multiple Sclerosis (MS) often negatively impact the employment of the person who has it. However, accommodations in the workplace can help to counteract disadvantages, and allow a person with MS to have successful and gainful employment.
Purpose:  The goal was to survey and analyze satisfaction and quality of life data from people who did or did not utilize workplace accommodations to help with their MS and to assist in their employment.
Setting:  The data was taken from adults in 9 chapters of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society in the United States.
Study sample:  The sample was 1,839 adults who were employed either full-time or part-time.
Data collection and analysis:  The survey given was a 96-item questionnaire that addressed several topics, such as demographics, overall health, support, and employment. Once collected, the data was analyzed with descriptive statistics
Findings:  Around 25% of people with MS in the workplace requested accommodations, and of those 87% received them. Those who used accommodations reported lower career optimism and satisfaction than those who did not.
Conclusions:  While accommodations do increase with greater cognitive impairment, they do not correlate to greater job satisfaction or longevity. Knowing this, it is important to continue research on the accommodations themselves and the way that one asks for them, and their effects on employment longevity.

Disabilities served:  Cognitive / intellectual impairment
Multiple sclerosis