Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Murphy, G.C., Young, A.E., Brown, D.J., & King, N.J. (2003). Explaining labor force status following spinal cord injury: The contribution of psychological variables. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, 35 (6), 276-283.
Title:  Explaining labor force status following spinal cord injury: The contribution of psychological variables
Authors:  Murphy, G.C., Young, A.E., Brown, D.J., & King, N.J.
Year:  2003
Journal/Publication:  Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine
Publisher:  Taylor and Francis
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1080/16501970310015209
Full text:  https://www.medicaljournals.se/jrm/content/abstract/10.1080/1650197...    |   PDF   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Not reported
Research design:  Survey research

Structured abstract:

Background:  Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) often limits the ability of a person to work. However, remaining productive is very important to the rehabilitation of a person with disabilities, and remains at a suboptimal level for all persons with disabilities, SCI patients included.
Purpose:  The goal of this study was to research the influence of demographic, injury, and psychological factors on the employment status of people with an SCI.
Setting:  The subjects were all patients treated for a SCI at one of two specialized treatment centers in Australia.
Study sample:  All subjects were discharged from a specialized treatment center with sever neurological damage, were between the ages of 16 and 65, and have had at least 18 months lapse since their initial surgery.
Data collection and analysis:  The data was collected from patients who were scheduled for review at a clinic. The 459 people who consented were given a brief survey, and had their Functional Independence scores provided to the researchers by the hospital. Logistical Regression was used to analyze the data in relation to the research question.
Findings:  Demographic, injury, and psychological factors were found to contribute 30% of the variance experienced in employment criteria. Psychological variables contributed the most out of all of the tested factors.
Conclusions:  While this study shows that psychological variables may have a much greater effect than previously thought, more research is necessary in order to gain a better understanding of the Return to Work process.

Disabilities served:  Spinal cord injury (SCI)
Outcomes:  Return to work