Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Krause, J. S., Sternberg, M., Maides, J., & Lottes, S. (1998). Employment after spinal cord injury: Differences related to geographic region, gender, and race. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 79 (6), 615-624.
Title:  Employment after spinal cord injury: Differences related to geographic region, gender, and race
Authors:  Krause, J. S., Sternberg, M., Maides, J., & Lottes, S.
Year:  1998
Journal/Publication:  Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Publisher:  Elsevier
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1016/S0003-9993(98)90033-8
Full text:  http://www.archives-pmr.org/article/S0003-9993(98)90033-8/abstract    |   PDF   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Not reported
Research design:  Survey research

Structured abstract:

Background:  A return to gainful employment is recognized as one of the most important milestones in rehabilitation post-Spinal Cord Injury (SCI). It improves an individual's well-being and financial situation. However, the SCI itself can be a large barrier to employment.
Purpose:  The goal was to study the relationship between biological characteristics of people who had an SCI and whether or not they returned to work.
Setting:  Two samples were taken, one from the Southeastern US and one from the Midwestern US.
Study sample:  64% of the sample were male, and 75% were Caucasian. The average age was 29, and the average time since they were injured with an SCI was 13.4 years.
Data collection and analysis:  The data was collected from a survey sent to each participant about their life situation. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics, and then each sample's data was compared to the other. Finally, logistic regression was used to determine which factors best predicted working outcomes.
Findings:  Midwestern subjects were far more likely to work than their Southeastern counterparts, at 50% to their 26%. The biographic variables of the participants were able to predict their work outcomes with 69% accuracy.
Conclusions:  The study found that rehabilitation professionals have many challenges regarding the employment of their SCI patients. Older patients have a much lower chance of gaining employment, and even younger patients may need to prepare to retire early, and all should be given accurate and plain chances of employment.

Disabilities served:  Spinal cord injury (SCI)
Outcomes:  Return to work