Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Hess, D. W., Ripley, D. L., McKinley, W. O., & Tewksbury, M. (2000). Predictors for return to work after spinal cord injury: A 3-year multicenter analysis. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 81 (3), 359-363.
Title:  Predictors for return to work after spinal cord injury: A 3-year multicenter analysis
Authors:  Hess, D. W., Ripley, D. L., McKinley, W. O., & Tewksbury, M.
Year:  2000
Journal/Publication:  Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Publisher:  Elsevier
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1016/S0003-9993(00)90084-4
Full text:  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003999300900844?...    |   PDF   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Not reported
Research design:  Database mining

Structured abstract:

Background:  Spinal Cord Injuries (SCI) have significant impacts on an individual's life and work ability. They lose time in productivity and money in medical bills. While almost half of people who have had an SCI are unemployed, studies show that being employed with an SCI is a psychological benefit, as well as a monetary one. The Motor Index Score is a value that denotes strength values for muscle groups in a human body. It is often used by rehabilitators to predict an individual's self-care ability after an injury.
Purpose:  The goal of the study was to determine if the MIS score is a good predictor of and individual's return to work.
Setting:  The data was collected from the United States, specifically at the National Spinal Cord Injury Statistical Center, between the years of 1986 and 1995.
Study sample:  The study population was 3,175 individuals between the ages of 18 and 65 who were employed when they received an SCI. Of those, only 1,857 were studied.
Data collection and analysis:  The data was collected from the patient records of the sample. When analyzed, the data was described and summarized, including the subjects' ages, races, levels of education, genders, and marital statuses.
Findings:  The study shows that the most impactful variables to an individual's return to work are their education, their MIS score, and their ethnicity.
Conclusions:  Because the study can predict an individual's return to work with 80% accuracy, it is a helpful tool in future rehabilitation efforts

Disabilities served:  Spinal cord injury (SCI)
Outcomes:  Return to work