Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Blackwell, T. L., Leierer, S., Haupt, S., & Kampotsis, A. (2003). Predictors of vocational rehabilitation return to work outcomes in workers compensation. Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, 46 (2), 108-114.
Title:  Predictors of vocational rehabilitation return to work outcomes in workers compensation
Authors:  Blackwell, T. L., Leierer, S., Haupt, S., & Kampotsis, A.
Year:  2003
Journal/Publication:  Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
Publisher:  Sage journals
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1177/00343552030460020501
Full text:  http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/00343552030460020501    |   PDF   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Not reported
Research design:  Database mining

Structured abstract:

Background:  Almost half of individuals who sustain a disabling injury do not return to work. The costs to businesses in 1998 providing compensation and medical care to these individuals was $41.7 million . These mounting costs mean that Return to Work (RTW) is very important, and increasing the proportion of people who do will save money in the long run and provide a better life for the people with the disabilities.
Purpose:  The goal of the study was to predict what factors may assist and encourage a person who was disabled in the course of their job to return to working, either at their original job or somewhere else.
Setting:  The study looked at data from 502 injured workers in Montana who received worker's compensation benefits, were insured under the State Compensation Insurance Fund (SCIF), and had a designated Vocational Rehabilitation provider.
Data collection and analysis:  Information was taken from the workers' case files, and divided into two main groups based on whether the injury occurred before or after July 1st, 1987. After that date, a worker's compensation law had gone into effect requiring workers' compensation insurance to provide vocational rehabilitation. The data was analyzed with a number of statistical tests, such as a goodness-of-fit test and logistic regression.
Findings:  The age, education, attorney involvement, vocational rehabilitation, and time between injury and referral hypothesized correctly predicted the RTW outcomes of 64% of the set of workers
Conclusions:  The study provided an updated model for predicting the likelihood of workers returning to work after a workplace injury, and we hope that this study encourages other researchers to investigate more factors.

Outcomes:  Return to work