Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Postema, S. G., Bongers, R. M., Brouwers, M. A., Burger, H., Norling-Hermansson, L. M., Reneman, M. F., Dijkstra, P.U., and van der Sluis, C. K. (2016). Upper limb absence: Predictors of work participation and work productivity. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 97 (6), 892-899.
Title:  Upper limb absence: Predictors of work participation and work productivity
Authors:  Postema, S. G., Bongers, R. M., Brouwers, M. A., Burger, H., Norling-Hermansson, L. M., Reneman, M. F., Dijkstra, P.U., and van der Sluis, C. K.
Year:  2016
Journal/Publication:  Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Publisher:  Elsevier
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2015.12.022
Full text:  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003999316000101?...   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Not reported
Research design:  Survey research

Structured abstract:

Purpose:  The goal of this study was to analyze the participation and productivity of people with upper limb absence, and determine how physical work demands and other factors contribute to their outcomes.
Setting:  The study took place in twelve rehabilitation centers and orthopedic workshops in the Netherlands.
Study sample:  A survey was sent to patients in the databases of 12 Dutch rehabilitaion centers who were 18 years or older, have an Upper Limb Absence, and could read and write Dutch.
Control or comparison condition:  The same survey as before, minus any questions about Limb Absence, were sent to a control group sourced from family and acquaintances of the researchers.
Data collection and analysis:  The survey contained questions about their absent limbs, the prosthesis they used, and their employment situation. Questions about general and mental health were also included, along with questions about pain, coping methods, and comorbidity. Categorical data was analyzed via the chi-square test, and continuous data used the independent t test or a 1-way analysis of variance.
Findings:  207 surveys remained after some participants were invalid for the study, or other problems with the surveys caused them to be ineligible for analysis. It was found that most individuals with ULA moved into mentally demanding work. ULA was found as being a significant contributor to unemployment in those who had it.17% of those who went back to work had to change their occupation, but remained employed by the same individual or company, while 30% had to change their employer entirely. 25% did not change their employment at all. Productivity did not seem to be affected by ULA.
Conclusions:  Work participation in people who had been born with a deficient limb was higher than those who has a limb amputated later in life. Productivity is unaffected.

Disabilities served:  Amputation
Outcomes:  Return to work