Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Umucu, E., Lee, B., Wu, J., Chan, F., Blake, J., Brooks, J., and Catalano, D. (2016). Self-efficacy as a mediator for the relationship between secure attachment style and employment status in individuals with spinal cord injuries. Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, 45 (1), 97-106.
Title:  Self-efficacy as a mediator for the relationship between secure attachment style and employment status in individuals with spinal cord injuries
Authors:  Umucu, E., Lee, B., Wu, J., Chan, F., Blake, J., Brooks, J., and Catalano, D.
Year:  2016
Journal/Publication:  Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation
Publisher:  National Rehabilitation Association
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.3233/JVR-160814
Full text:  http://content.iospress.com/download/journal-of-vocational-rehabili...    |   PDF   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Yes
Research design:  Survey research

Structured abstract:

Background:  Spinal cord injuries (SCI) are a category of chronic physical disability, and 60% of those diagnosed with it are jobless. Seeing as employment is recognized as a positive psychological factor for people with disabilities, improving their determination, self-esteem, and the way they adjust to their life, that is a problem. Self-efficacy is how much a person feels like they can solve a problem. There may be a relation between this and employment status, but little research has been done.
Purpose:  To better understand how self-efficacy effects the relationship between secure attachments and employment in persons with spinal cord injuries.
Setting:  The surveyed group were all from the Canadian Paraplegic Association, and thus were all from Canada; Alberta, Manitoba, Nova Scotia, Ontario, and Saskatchewan being the specific provinces.
Study sample:  The sample consisted of 190 individuals between the ages of 25 and 54 years, all with spinal cord injuries. The majority were White and Male.
Data collection and analysis:  The data was collected via a survey, which asked participants questions relating to their attachment styles, self-efficacy, and employment status. A correlation and mediation analysis using multiple regression and logistic regression were used to see if self-efficacy had a mediating effect on the relationship between and individual's attachment style and their employment status.
Findings:  Secure attachments and self-efficacy both had a positive influence on employment status, and self-efficacy does mediate the relationship between secure attachment and employment in those with SCI.

Disabilities served:  Spinal cord injury (SCI)