Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Friesen, B. J., Cross, T. L., Jivanjee, P., Thristrup, A., Bandurraga, A., Gowen, L. K., & Rountree, J. (2015). Meeting the transition needs of urban American Indian/Alaska Native Youth through culturally based services. The Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research, 42 (2), 191-205.
Title:  Meeting the transition needs of urban American Indian/Alaska Native Youth through culturally based services
Authors:  Friesen, B. J., Cross, T. L., Jivanjee, P., Thristrup, A., Bandurraga, A., Gowen, L. K., & Rountree, J.
Year:  2015
Journal/Publication:  The Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research
Publisher:  Springer
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1007/s11414-014-9447-2
Full text:  https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11414-014-9447-2   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Not reported

Structured abstract:

Purpose:  This article reports findings from three qualitative studies that examine supports for successful transitions of American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth to adulthood.
Data collection and analysis:  A research partnership was developed between a culturally based community agency, the Native American Youth and Family Center (NAYA), the National Indian Child Welfare Association, and Portland State University. The studies discussed utilized a Relational Worldview (RWV) framework, where well-being is understood to be a balance among the domains of mind, body, spirit, and context.
Findings:  Findings show that NAYA employs culturally grounded interventions to overcome the traumatic histories and current oppressive conditions affecting low-income urban AI/AN youth with mental health challenges and to support their well-being and transition to adulthood. Findings also suggest that addressing the mental health and well-being of AI/AN youth in culturally appropriate ways involves consideration of all RWV domains.
Conclusions:  The authors recommend that connections of AI/AN youth to culturally specific services should be used whenever possible, as well as the utilization of cultural consultants, and implementation of holistic and positive approaches to mental health.

Disabilities served:  Chronic mental illness
Populations served:  Transition-age youth (14 - 24)
Culturally diverse populations (e.g., African Americans, Native Americans, and non-English speaking populations)
Interventions:  Other