Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Smedema, S. M., Sharp, S., Thompson, K., Friefeld, R. (2016). Evaluation of a biopsychosocial model of life satisfaction in individuals with spinal cord injuries. Journal of Rehabilitation, 82 (4), 39-47.
Title:  Evaluation of a biopsychosocial model of life satisfaction in individuals with spinal cord injuries
Authors:  Smedema, S. M., Sharp, S., Thompson, K., Friefeld, R.
Year:  2016
Journal/Publication:  Journal of Rehabilitation
Publisher:  National Rehabilitation Association
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1037/rep0000150
Full text:  http://psycnet.apa.org/record/2017-22652-003    |   PDF   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Yes
Research design:  Survey research

Structured abstract:

Background:  The biopsychosocial model is a model of patient care that attempts to take into consideration all the biological, social, and psychological aspects of a patient's life during their care, and it often reports great success, and rehabilitates patients better than older models.
Purpose:  The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of what biopsychosocial factors mean the most to people with spinal cord injuries, and check it against modern biopsychosocial models.
Setting:  The survey was giving to a wide range of people via the internet.
Study sample:  The sample consisted of 247 adults from a variety of backgrounds and levels of education, but who all had some form of spinal cord injury.
Data collection and analysis:  The data was collected from the survey and subjected to various indices, including a chi-square goodness-of-fit test in order to see how well the current biopsychosocial model explains the variance of the data.
Findings:  The current model explains 58% of the variance in the responses gathered. However, the biological component of the survey did not match the model very well.
Conclusions:  The biological components that affect a person's well being mostly boil down to the amount of pain they experience, rather than the severity of their injuries. It is also worth noting that social factors do not greatly affect a person's life directly, but they exert a an indirect effect on a person's psychological well-being.

Disabilities served:  Spinal cord injury (SCI)