Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Rumrill, P. D., Li, J., Roessler, R. T., Hendricks, D. J., Bishop, M. L., Leslie, M. (2016). Women with multiple sclerosis and the importance and satisfaction they ascribe to selected employment concerns: Results from a national survey. Journal of Rehabilitation, 82 (2), 51-58.
Title:  Women with multiple sclerosis and the importance and satisfaction they ascribe to selected employment concerns: Results from a national survey
Authors:  Rumrill, P. D., Li, J., Roessler, R. T., Hendricks, D. J., Bishop, M. L., Leslie, M.
Year:  2016
Journal/Publication:  Journal of Rehabilitation
Publisher:  National Rehabilitation Association
Full text:  https://www.questia.com/library/journal/1G1-459722858/women-with-mu...    |   PDF   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  No
Research design:  Survey research

Structured abstract:

Background:  People with disabilities can often feel the pressure of discrimination in the workplace, and women are no exception to this. However, very little research has been done in this field. The need to understand women's needs in the workplace in regards to multiple sclerosis is growing, especially as the number of women with MS is increasing far beyond the number of men.
Purpose:  The purpose of this study was to gain information from women with MS as to what facets of their employment they found important, and which they were satisfied or dissatisfied with.
Setting:  The sample consists of 1,512 women with MS from all across the United States.
Study sample:  The sample is a subsection of a larger survey. The sample researched contained 75.6% Caucasians, 11% African Americans, 10.3% Latinas, and .5% for Asians, Pacific Islanders, Alaskan Natives, and Native Americans. All sampled were women, and 52.7% described their community as suburban, 25.2% identified it as urban, and 22.1% lived in rural communities.
Data collection and analysis:  The data was collected from a national survey, and the women's concerns were rated by how important they thought each employment concern was, and how satisfied they were with the concern. A high satisfaction rating was defined as a concern that 60% or more women were satisfied with, and a high importance rating was any concern more than 60% of women marked as important.
Findings:  It was found that all 38 concerns were rated as important, and that most employment strengths were rated as satisfactory, including lack of discrimination and physical access to work facilities. However, most employment weaknesses were rated unsatisfactory, with women stating that they were unaware of their rights under the american disabilities act, and may not know what to do if they encountered discrimination at work.
Conclusions:  This research shows that more work needs to be put into educating women with MS as to their rights and what they can expect from their employers due to disability legislation. It also shows that more services and support is needed to assist in overcoming the twin disadvantages of having MS and being a women, both of which have an impact on being hired for a job.

Disabilities served:  Multiple sclerosis
Populations served:  Gender: Female