Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Hink, A. B., Toschlog, E., Waibel, B., & Bard, M. (2015). Risks go beyond the violence: Association between intimate partner violence, mental illness, and substance abuse among females admitted to a rural Level I trauma center.. Journal of Trauma & Acute Care Surgery, 79 (5), 709-716.
Title:  Risks go beyond the violence: Association between intimate partner violence, mental illness, and substance abuse among females admitted to a rural Level I trauma center.
Authors:  Hink, A. B., Toschlog, E., Waibel, B., & Bard, M.
Year:  2015
Journal/Publication:  Journal of Trauma & Acute Care Surgery
Publisher:  Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000000856
Full text:  http://journals.lww.com/jtrauma/Abstract/2015/11000/Risks_go_beyond...   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Not reported

Structured abstract:

Background:  Intimate partner violence (IPV) is an under-recognized cause of injury among women. IPV and its relationship to other risk factors for injury has been poorly defined by research.
Purpose:  The purpose of this study is to determine IPV's associate with alcohol abuse, substance use, mental illness, and other injury risk factors.
Setting:  This cross-sectional study collected data from adult females who were admitted to a rural, Level I trauma center.
Data collection and analysis:  Researchers assessed IPV, substance abuse, and mental illness with well-validated instruments. Bivariate relationships were assess with ?, odds ratios, and t tests.
Findings:  Of the 81 women enrolled in the study, 51% reported lifetime of IPV, while 31% reported IPV in the previous 12-months. These groups were significantly more likely to have a mental illness than those who did not report IPV. Those who reported lifetime IPV were significantly more likely to report substance abuse, while those with past-year IPV were more likely to report alcohol abuse. They were also significantly more likely to have a partner that possessed a weapon.
Conclusions:  Women at a Level I, rural trauma center experienced a high level of lifetime and 12-month past IPV. These levels of IPV were significantly associated with mental illness, substance abuse, and high-risk for injury. These findings express the importance of IPV screenings and interventions for rural women.

Disabilities served:  Alcohol and drug abuse
Chronic mental illness
Populations served:  Rural and remote communities