Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Slayter, E. M. (2010). Disparities in access to substance abuse treatment among people with intellectual disabilities and serious mental illness.. Health & Social Work, 35 (1), 49-59.
Title:  Disparities in access to substance abuse treatment among people with intellectual disabilities and serious mental illness.
Authors:  Slayter, E. M.
Year:  2010
Journal/Publication:  Health & Social Work
Publisher:  Oxford University Press
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1093/hsw/35.1.49
Full text:  https://academic.oup.com/hsw/article/35/1/49/2182099/Disparities-in...   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Not reported

Structured abstract:

Background:  Individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) experience increasing levels of participation within their communities. Along with facilitating community inclusion, this freedom has also brought an increased access to drugs and alcohol and the potential for developing substance abuse. Individuals with ID and co-occuring serious mental illness (SMI) may be particularly vulnerable to substance abuse disorders.
Study sample:  The authors retrospectively examined substance abuse access rates for Medicaid beneficiaries with intellectual disabilities/serious mental illness/ and substance abuse ages 12 to 99 (N=5,099) and their counterparts without ID/SMI/SA (N=221,875).
Data collection and analysis:  The authors conducted age-adjusted odds ratios and logistic regression models.
Findings:  Participants with ID/SA/SMI were less likely to access treatment. Initiation factors included being nonwhite, living in a rural community, and not being dually eligible for Medicare. Engagement factors included all of the same and having a fee-for-service plan, a chronic SA-related disorder, or both.
Conclusions:  The authors outline the implications of these findings for social work policy and practice in order to improve the outcomes of people with ID/SA/SMI.

Disabilities served:  Chronic mental illness
Developmental disabilities
Multiple disabilities
Populations served:  Persons with multiple disabilities (e.g., deaf-blindness, HIV/AIDS, substance abuse)
Interventions:  Psychological counseling