Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Stewart, K. E., Phillips, M. M., Walker, J. F., Harvey, S. A., & Porter, A. (2011). Social services utilization and need among a community sample of persons living with HIV in the rural south.. AIDS Care, 23 (3), 340-347.
Title:  Social services utilization and need among a community sample of persons living with HIV in the rural south.
Authors:  Stewart, K. E., Phillips, M. M., Walker, J. F., Harvey, S. A., & Porter, A.
Year:  2011
Journal/Publication:  AIDS Care
Publisher:  Taylor & Francis
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1080/09540121.2010.507743
Full text:  http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09540121.2010.507743   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Not reported

Structured abstract:

Background:  Studies of urban individuals living with HIV suggest that using social services can enhance the quality of life and medical outcomes. However, there is little known about social service usage and outcomes among rural southern individuals with HIV.
Study sample:  The sample consisted of 476 adults living with HIV in Alabama. This sample was 66% male, 76% Black, and 26% with education less than high school.
Data collection and analysis:  The authors used the 2007 AIDS Alabama Needs Assessment Survey to develop service utilization/need ("SUN") scores for 14 social services. They then used regression models to determine if demographic predictors exists for those most likely to need each social service. An exploratory factor analysis was also conducted to see if certain services clustered together for the sample.
Findings:  Case management, assistance obtaining medical care, and financial assistance were cited as the most commonly used or most needed by the participants of the survey. Black participants were more likely to have higher SUN scores for alcohol treatment and assistance with employment, housing, food, finances, and pharmaceuticals. Female participants were more likely to express need for help with childcare. Black participants and those unemployed were more likely to have the highest SUN scores.
Conclusions:  The findings of this study provide critical information about individuals with HIV living in the rural southern U.S. and their service needs.

Disabilities served:  HIV / AIDS
Populations served:  Rural and remote communities