Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  De Marco, A., Vernon-Feagans, & Family Life Project Key Investigators (2015). Child care subsidy use and child care quality in low-wealth, rural communities. Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 36 (3), 383-395.
Title:  Child care subsidy use and child care quality in low-wealth, rural communities
Authors:  De Marco, A., Vernon-Feagans, & Family Life Project Key Investigators
Year:  2015
Journal/Publication:  Journal of Family and Economic Issues
Publisher:  Springer
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10834-014-9401-8
Full text:  http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10834-014-9401-8   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Not reported

Structured abstract:

Background:  Child care subsidy programs are intended to reduce the impact of child care as a barrier to work.
Purpose:  The authors of this article examine the use of child care subsidy programs of rural families, the child care arrangements they typically make, and the quality of the child care received.
Study sample:  This study sample included a representative, longitudinal study of non-metro families in low-wealth counties (n = 1,292), oversampling low-income and African American families.
Data collection and analysis:  This data was collected between 2004 and 2007 by the Family Life Project.
Findings:  The analysis found that families who utilized child care subsidies were more likely to choose center-based care, typically of higher quality. They were also more likely to receive higher quality of child care, regardless of the type selected.
Conclusions:  The authors suggest that subsidy programs have been successful in moving low-income children into higher quality child care, which is beneficial for child development. This study showcases the need to maintain child care subsidy programs and encourage eligible families to take advantage of available resources.

Populations served:  Rural and remote communities
Other
Culturally diverse populations (e.g., African Americans, Native Americans, and non-English speaking populations)