Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Roux, A.M., Shattuck, P.T., Cooper, B.P., Anderson, K.A., Wagner, M., & Narendorf, S.C. (2013). Postsecondary employment experiences among young adults with an autism spectrum disorder. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 52 (9), 931-939.
Title:  Postsecondary employment experiences among young adults with an autism spectrum disorder
Authors:  Roux, A.M., Shattuck, P.T., Cooper, B.P., Anderson, K.A., Wagner, M., & Narendorf, S.C.
Year:  2013
Journal/Publication:  Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Publisher:  Elsevier
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2013.05.019
Full text:  http://www.jaacap.com/article/S0890-8567(13)00377-8/abstract    |   PDF   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Not reported

Structured abstract:

Background:  There are limited details in existing publications about the characteristics of employment experiences of young adults with an ASD. In addition, evidence about employment of young adults with an ASD is largely derived from samples that are small or not pop- ulation based, and studies of those who are already engaged with the U.S. Vocational Rehabilitation system, thereby limiting the generalizability of findings.
Purpose:  The purpose of this research is to examine postsecondary employment experiences of young adults with an autism spectrum disorder and compared these outcomes with those of young adults with different disabilities.
Study sample:  Data in this study were from Wave 5 of the National Longitudinal Transition Study–2 (NLTS2) (N=620), which is a nationally representative survey of young adults who had received special education services during high school.
Data collection and analysis:  Data in this study was analyzed with Stata 12, using survey weighting and appropriate variance adjustment for the complex survey design.
Findings:  The findings show that about one-half (53.4%) of young adults with an ASD had ever worked for pay outside the home since leaving high school, the lowest rate among disability groups. Young adults with an ASD earned an average of $8.10 per hour, significantly lower than average wages for young adults in the comparison groups, and held jobs that clustered within fewer occupational types. Odds of ever having had a paid job were higher for those who were older, from higher-income households, and with better conversational abilities or func- tional skills.
Conclusions:  The findings of worse employment outcomes for young adults with an ASD suggest that this population is experiencing particular difficulty in successfully tran- sitioning into employment. Research is needed to determine strategies for improving outcomes as these young adults transition into adulthood.

Disabilities served:  Autism / ASD
Populations served:  Adjudicated adults and youth
Outcomes:  Wages