Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Pfaller, J.S., Tu, W., Morrison, B., Chan, F., Owens, L., Anderson, C.A., Fitzgerald, S., & Menz, F. (2016). Social-cognitive predictors of readiness to use evidence-based practice: A survey of community-based rehabilitation practitioners. Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, 60 (1), 7-15.
Title:  Social-cognitive predictors of readiness to use evidence-based practice: A survey of community-based rehabilitation practitioners
Authors:  Pfaller, J.S., Tu, W., Morrison, B., Chan, F., Owens, L., Anderson, C.A., Fitzgerald, S., & Menz, F.
Year:  2016
Journal/Publication:  Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
Publisher:  Sage Publications, Inc.
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1177/0034355215591779
Full text:  http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0034355215591779    |   PDF   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Yes

Structured abstract:

Background:  Community-based rehabilitation organizations (CBRO) are important providers of rehabilitation and support services to people with disabilities. As state vocational rehabilitation agencies increasingly use CBROs, it is important they understand how CBROs use evidence-based practices (EBPs).
Purpose:  To examine how ready CBRO practitioners are to implement EBP, based on social-cognitive predictors of confidence in knowledge and use of EBP; the benefits expected from using EBP; and any perceived barriers to and supports for the use EBP.
Setting:  Community-Based Rehabilitation Organizations (CBRO)
Study sample:  187 CBRO professionals
Intervention:  The Evidence-Based Practice in Community-Based Rehabilitation Organizations (EBP-CBRO) survey
Control or comparison condition:  N/A
Data collection and analysis:  Descriptive statistics, t test, ANOVA, multiple regression, and estimates of internal consistency were computed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 22.0.
Findings:  Study findings indicate that social-cognitive theory (SCT) predictors are useful in understanding CBRO practitioners' readiness to use EBP . Scales used within this survey had high internal consistency reliability coefficients.
Conclusions:  The authors found that CBRO practitioners generally hold favorable views of EBPs and consider them useful in improving outcomes. This suggests that CBROs support the adoption of innovative practices across disciplines and CBRO roles, in general. Importantly, study findings suggest that continuing education and in-service training on EBP significantly improve practitioner confidence, expected benefits, and readiness to adopt EBP.

Populations served:  Transition-age youth (14 - 24)
Adjudicated adults and youth
Consumers receiving federal financial assistance through TANF
Culturally diverse populations (e.g., African Americans, Native Americans, and non-English speaking populations)
High school dropouts / functionally illiterate persons
Persons with multiple disabilities (e.g., deaf-blindness, HIV/AIDS, substance abuse)
SSI and SSDI recipients
Sub-minimum wage employees
Youth in foster care
Interventions:  Vocational rehabilitation