Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Petry, N.M., Andrade, L.F., Rash, C.J., & Cherniack, M.G. (2014). Engaging in job-related activities is associated with reductions in employment problems and improvements in quality of life in substance abusing patients. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors?: Journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors, 28 (1), 268–275.
Title:  Engaging in job-related activities is associated with reductions in employment problems and improvements in quality of life in substance abusing patients
Authors:  Petry, N.M., Andrade, L.F., Rash, C.J., & Cherniack, M.G.
Year:  2014
Journal/Publication:  Psychology of Addictive Behaviors?: Journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors
Publisher:  American Psychological Association
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1037/a0032264
Full text:  http://doi.org/10.1037/a0032264   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  No

Structured abstract:

Background:  Reinforcement-based interventions are highly efficacious in the treatment of substance use disorders, and their benefits can extend to other areas of functioning as well.
Purpose:  In particular, reinforcing participation in job-related activities may be useful for improving employment outcomes, which in turn may enhance quality of life and decrease substance use.
Setting:  These secondary analyses compared substance abusing patients randomized to reinforcement interventions (N = 185) who selected and completed two or more job-related activities during treatment versus those who did not.
Control or comparison condition:  Patients who completed two or more job-related activities during treatment had significantly greater reductions in employment-related problems and improvements in quality of life than those who completed only one or no job-related activities, even after controlling for baseline differences that may impact employment outcomes. Further, patients who completed employment activities remained in treatment significantly longer and achieved greater durations of abstinence than those who did not.
Findings:  Participants who completed two or more employment-related activities were generally similar to those who did not with respect to demographic characteristics. However, those who completed employment activities had lower ASI-medical and ASI-drug scores at baseline than those who did not, so subsequent analyses controlled for these differences as well as gender and age, which are related to employment difficulties.
Conclusions:  These data suggest that reinforcing job-attainment activities may have broad beneficial effects. Reinforcement interventions should be considered for enhancing employment skills training acquisition more generally.

Disabilities served:  Alcohol and drug abuse
Populations served:  Persons with multiple disabilities (e.g., deaf-blindness, HIV/AIDS, substance abuse)
Interventions:  Training
Vocational rehabilitation
Outcomes:  Employment acquisition