Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Achola, E.O. & Greene, G. (2016). Person-family centered transition planning: Improving post-school outcomes to culturally diverse youth and families. Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, 45 (2), 173-183.
Title:  Person-family centered transition planning: Improving post-school outcomes to culturally diverse youth and families
Authors:  Achola, E.O. & Greene, G.
Year:  2016
Journal/Publication:  Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation
Publisher:  IOS Press
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.3233/JVR-160821
Full text:  http://content.iospress.com/articles/journal-of-vocational-rehabili...   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  No

Structured abstract:

Background:  The persistent patterns of unsatisfactory transition experiences and adult outcomes of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) youth with disabilities are well documented in existing transition literature. The consequences of these circumstances for this unique population of individuals with disabilities are long term and far reaching, both individually and collectively. Unfortunately, despite many years of transition outcomes research, there is a dearth of literature on effective empirically-based culturally reciprocal transition practices.
Purpose:  In this conceptual article, we provide a framework for thinking about how to best plan for and facilitate positive transition outcomes for CLD youth with disabilities who come from families whose value systems differ from those of mainstream American society. Specifically we present a person-family interdependent approach to transition that emphasizes family empowerment, sustainability of transition services, and adaptations to the transition planning process.
Conclusions:  In contrast and in comparison to the more traditional approach to transition that is currently practiced in American public schools, we believe that this person-family interdependent approach, if adopted, may result in better long term transition outcomes for CLD youth with disabilities as well as greater satisfaction of their families with the transition planning process.

Disabilities served:  Multiple disabilities
Populations served:  Transition-age youth (14 - 24)
Culturally diverse populations (e.g., African Americans, Native Americans, and non-English speaking populations)