Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Phillips, B. N., Deiches, J., Morrison, B., Chan, F., & Bezyak, J. L. (2015). Disability diversity training in the workplace: Systematic review and future directions. Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation, 1-12.
Title:  Disability diversity training in the workplace: Systematic review and future directions
Authors:  Phillips, B. N., Deiches, J., Morrison, B., Chan, F., & Bezyak, J. L.
Year:  2015
Journal/Publication:  Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation
Publisher:  Springer
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10926-015-9612-3
Full text:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26519035   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Yes
Research design:  Systematic review / meta-analysis

Structured abstract:

Background:  Employer policies and practices impact the employment of individuals with disabilities. Research has documented negative employer attitudes. Few strategies to change these attitudes have been developed. Reducing stigma toward employing and retaining employees with disabilities may improve employment outcomes. Disability diversity training, is a possible approach to for helping employers recruit, hire, and retain people with disabilities.
Purpose:  The goal of this study was to conduct a systematic review to determine the use and effectiveness of disability diversity training as a way to improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities. The research study question addressed in the review was "Which disability diversity training interventions have positive effects on employment-related outcomes for people with disabilities?"
Intervention:  There was no intervention.
Control or comparison condition:  There was no control or comparison condition.
Data collection and analysis:  The inclusion criteria for population men and women working as an employer, employee or human resources professional in any size of business in any sector, except for disability services agencies. Interventions included studies evaluating disability diversity programs or interventions set in the workplace. Comparison/control criteria were studies that had a "comparator" group. Outcomes included any outcome that related to obtaining or retaining employment for individuals with disabilities. Ten key search terms were identified through reviewing the literature and consulting with experts. Five electronic bibliographic data bases were searched for peer reviewed articles that reported on disability diversity training as a way to improve employment outcomes of individuals with disabilities. Reference lists in included articles were reviewed an relevant studies were solicited from content experts. Only articles that addressed disability related to training were included. A two step process was used to identify studies for inclusion.
Findings:  The five data base searches resulted in n = 1322 articles for possible inclusion. An abstract screening led to the elimination of n = 1311 articles, leaving 11 articles for review. After a full text review n = 9 articles were eliminated, leaving 2 articles that met the inclusion critieria. One additional article was identified by a topic expert. A total of n = 3 articles met the inclusion criteria for the review. Two studies included pre-post comparison. The remaining study employed a controlled case study design. The quality of the studies reviewed was low. Only one study included a randomly assigned control group,while the other two included pre-post comparisons for treatment groups only. None of the studies controlled for the effects of potentially confounding variables.
Conclusions:  Research is limited. The overall quality of available evidence about the effectiveness of disability diversity training is also limited. More research is needed to determine if disability diversity training is an effective intervention to help employer recognize the benefits of employing and retaining individuals with disabilities as part of their diversity initiatives. Future studies should strive for more rigorous methodology to enhance the quality of the research. This review provides an understanding about research in this area and some initial indication of disability diversity training effectiveness in the workplace.