Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Karpur, A., VanLooy, S. A., & Bruyère, M. (2014). Employer practices for employment of people with disabilities: A literature scoping review.. Rehabilitation Research, Policy and Education, 28 (4), 225-241.
Title:  Employer practices for employment of people with disabilities: A literature scoping review.
Authors:  Karpur, A., VanLooy, S. A., & Bruyère, M.
Year:  2014
Journal/Publication:  Rehabilitation Research, Policy and Education
Publisher:  Springer Publishing Company
Full text:  https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ1048473   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Yes
Research design:  Literature review

Structured abstract:

Background:  Much of the literature about employment and people with disabilities that was published over the past two decades, does not focus on employer perspectives and practices. Instead the focus has generally been on the views of people with disabilities and service providers. Research about employer views would provide valuable information about possible ways to improve employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities.
Purpose:  The goal was to identify existing evidence, research approaches used, and the groups that had been targeted for dissemination of information to help determine the gaps in the employer practices literature.
Setting:  There was no setting.
Study sample:  Initially 867 articles were identified. Additional sorting resulted in 243 research articles to include in the scoping review.
Intervention:  There was no intervention.
Control or comparison condition:  There was no control or comparison condition.
Data collection and analysis:  After the articles had been sorted, the remaining ones were categorized in to areas of employer practices. These were then categorized by research purpose and target audience and classified by research approach. The data was entered into a spreadsheet. Inter-rater reliability was verified. As needed, independent reviewers reassessed the articles.
Findings:  The majority of articles or 75% were published in peer reviewed journals. Over half the articles reported on the following: work place accommodation (63%), organizational culture, climate and attitudes toward people with disabilities (55%), and or recruitment and hiring (53%). The goal of most of the research or (69%) was related to evaluate or assess the impact of particular employment practices. Related to methodology, most of the articles or 56% of those reviewed focused on survey methods to collect data. The majority or 56% of the articles had advocacy groups and service providers as the intended audience for dissemination. Only 27% of the articles were geared towards employers, HR personnel, supervisors or coworkers and only 14% at policy makers.
Conclusions:  Existing research about employer practices and policies focus on the supply side. More employer or demand side research is needed.