Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Trenaman, L.M., Miller, W.C., Escorpizo, R., & the SCIRE Research Team (2014). Interventions for improving employment outcomes among individuals with spinal cord injury: A systematic review. Spinal Cord, 52 788-794.
Title:  Interventions for improving employment outcomes among individuals with spinal cord injury: A systematic review
Authors:  Trenaman, L.M., Miller, W.C., Escorpizo, R., & the SCIRE Research Team
Year:  2014
Journal/Publication:  Spinal Cord
Publisher:  International Spinal Cord Society
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1038/sc.2014.149
Full text:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25179659   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  No
Research design:  Systematic review / meta-analysis

Structured abstract:

Background:  Research indicates individuals with SCI experience high variability in employment rates. Reasons for this include differences in study design, sample characteristics, definitions of employment and more. Overall around 35% are employed post injury. Those who are unemployed also report a desire and ability to work. Examining interventions to assist individuals with SCI with employment could improve outcomes.
Purpose:  The main purpose of this study was to evaluate return to work interventions for individuals with SCI.
Setting:  There was not setting this is a systematic review of the literature.
Study sample:  There was no study sample this is a systematic review of the literature.
Intervention:  There was no intervention this is a systematic review of the literature.
Control or comparison condition:  There was no control or comparison condition. This is a systematic review of the literature.
Data collection and analysis:  An electronic data base search was conducted. A study was included if it examined interventions for individuals with SCI where employment was the outcome. Reviews, studies not published in English and non peered reviewed works were excluded.
Findings:  A total of 14 studies met the inclusion criteria. They were published between 1982 and 2012. Most were from the United State (n=9). There were two randomized trials, the remaining studies were observational.
Conclusions:  High quality research about interventions to assist individuals with SCI return to work is limited. There is a need for more studies. Supported employment has been effective for individuals with SCI.

Disabilities served:  Spinal cord injury (SCI)
Outcomes:  Other