Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Rumrill, P. D., Roessler, R. T., McMahon, B. T., Hennessey, M. L., & Neath, J (2007). Gender as a differential indicator of the employment discrimination experiences of Americans with multiple sclerosis. Work, 29 (4), 303-311.
Title:  Gender as a differential indicator of the employment discrimination experiences of Americans with multiple sclerosis
Authors:  Rumrill, P. D., Roessler, R. T., McMahon, B. T., Hennessey, M. L., & Neath, J
Year:  2007
Journal/Publication:  Work
Publisher:  IOS Press
Full text:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18057570   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  No
Research design:  Database mining

Structured abstract:

Background:  Americans living with multiple sclerosis (MS) are an educated, experienced, and yet largely unemployed group. About 2/3 of individuals with MS were working at the time of diagnosis but at a 7 year follow up 45% had disengaged from the workforce.
Purpose:  The purpose of this study was to examine the nature of discrimination experiences of individuals with MS and use gender to compare those experiences.
Study sample:  Data on discrimination cases involving individuals with MS from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) database.
Data collection and analysis:  Data was collected from the EEOC database and analyzed using chi-square analyses.
Findings:  Both women and men were likely to allege discharge and reasonable accommodation related discrimination. Men were more likely to allege hiring and reinstatement related discrimination and women were more likely to allege harassment. Women were more likely to file against the service industry and men more likely against construction, manufacturing, and wholesale.
Conclusions:  These findings indicate just as many similarities as differences between the genders in MS related employment discrimination. These findings can be used to help design interventions to improve the work outcomes of individuals with MS.

Disabilities served:  Multiple sclerosis