Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Roessler, R. T., Turner, R. C., Roberson, J. L., & Rumrill, P. D. (2005). Gender and perceived illness severity: Differential indicators of employment concerns for adults with multiple sclerosis. Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, 48 (2), 66074.
Title:  Gender and perceived illness severity: Differential indicators of employment concerns for adults with multiple sclerosis
Authors:  Roessler, R. T., Turner, R. C., Roberson, J. L., & Rumrill, P. D.
Year:  2005
Journal/Publication:  Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
Publisher:  Sage Journals
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1177/00343552050480020101
Full text:  http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/00343552050480020101   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  No
Research design:  Survey research

Structured abstract:

Background:  Adults living with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) are typically well educated and have extensive work histories. Despite this anywhere from 40% to 80% of them are unemployed. In order to reverse this trend it is important to gather as much information as possible about the effectiveness of disability and employment related services and practices. It is also important to note whether or not the evaluation of those services differ according to gender and MS severity.
Purpose:  The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between gender and employment concerns of individuals with MS.
Study sample:  Participants (N=1,310) came from different state MS chapters in the United States. Seventy-eight percent of the sample was female and 21% was male. The participants were mostly Caucasian (92%) and averaged 50 years old. Forty percent of the sample graduated college and fatigue (82%) was the most commonly reported symptom.
Data collection and analysis:  Participants answered a survey containing various demographic, disease, and employment related variables. A multivariate analysis of variance was used to determine the target variables.
Findings:  Both genders indicated dissatisfaction with employer support, program knowledge, external support, service provision, work potential, and prescriptions and health care.
Conclusions:  These results indicate the significant need to improve employment related services for individuals with MS.

Disabilities served:  Multiple sclerosis