Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  McFadden, E., Horton, M.C., Ford, H.L., Gilworth, G. McFadden, M.,& Tennant, A. (2012). Screening for the risk of job loss in multiple sclerosis (MS): Development of an MS-specific Work Instability Scale (MS-WIS). Multiple Sclerosis Journal, 18 (6), 862-870.
Title:  Screening for the risk of job loss in multiple sclerosis (MS): Development of an MS-specific Work Instability Scale (MS-WIS)
Authors:  McFadden, E., Horton, M.C., Ford, H.L., Gilworth, G. McFadden, M.,& Tennant, A.
Year:  2012
Journal/Publication:  Multiple Sclerosis Journal
Publisher:  Sage
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1177/1352458511428463
Full text:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22041093   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  No

Structured abstract:

Background:  Adults with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience high rates of unemployment. Disease related factors associated with poor employment outcomes include: degree of physical impairment and cognitive problems. Work instability may arise when there is a mismatch between functional (in)capacity and work demands. This can lead to problems at work which may lead to job loss. When problems surface,vocational rehabilitation and other interventions may help individuals with MS retain work. The ability to screen workers for instability at work could indicate risk and lead to early intervention.
Purpose:  The aim of this study was to develop a scale to screen workers with MS for work instability.
Setting:  Information was gathered related to instrument development in a variety of places.
Study sample:  Participants were recruited from a MS data base and nurses who specialized in caring for individuals with MS. Different samples were drawn at various stages of the study.
Intervention:  There was no intervention.
Control or comparison condition:  There was no control or comparison condition.
Data collection and analysis:  Qualitative interviews were conducted with people with MS in order to examine work instability. Four main areas emerged; physical and cognitive aspects of the disease, working environment and organization factors, social and psychological aspects of work. The results from the interviews were used to develop items for the MS Specific Work Instability Scale. An analysis was used to refine the scale which was then validated against vocational assessment completed by experts.
Findings:  A easy to implement, 22 item self administered scale was developed. The scale rates whether or not the worker needs advice, information and referral or an urgent referral for support designed to enhance job retention. The MS-WIS identified employment challenges early on which allowed proactive support and interventions to maintain work.
Conclusions:  The MS-WIS gives clinicians an opportunity to identify problems at work and intervene prior to the worker losing his or her job.

Disabilities served:  Multiple sclerosis
Populations served:  Gender: Female and Male