Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Verhoef, J.A.C., Miedema, H.S., Meeteren, J.V., Stam, H.J., & Roebroeck, M.E. (2013). A new intervention to improve work participation of young adults with physical disabilities: a feasibility study. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology,
Title:  A new intervention to improve work participation of young adults with physical disabilities: a feasibility study
Authors:  Verhoef, J.A.C., Miedema, H.S., Meeteren, J.V., Stam, H.J., & Roebroeck, M.E.
Year:  2013
Journal/Publication:  Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Publisher:  Mac Keith Press
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1111/dmcn.12158
Full text:  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/dmcn.12158/abstract   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  No
Research design:  Quasi-experimental

Structured abstract:

Background:  More research about how to best support young adults with physical disabilities with the transition into adulthood is needed. This should address ways to enhance independence, employment, and quality of life. Young adults with physical disabilities face multiple challenges to employment. Information about how to support them in this area is necessary.
Purpose:  This purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness, in terms of implementation and cost,of an employment intervention for young adults with physical disabilities.
Setting:  The study took place in an outpatient rehabilitation clinic in the Netherlands and various places of employment.
Study sample:  Participants included 12 young adults with physical disabilities. The group was comprised of 50% males and 50% females who ranged in age from 19 to 28 years. All had physical disability and no intellectual disability. Additionally, they were either unemployed or expected to complete an educational program within 6 months of being accepted into the study.
Intervention:  A one year multidisciplinary vocational rehabilitation intervention known as "At work?!" was used. This intervention brought together vocational and rehabilitation services and included a group program along with individual assessments and coaching.
Control or comparison condition:  There was no control or comparison condition.
Data collection and analysis:  A pre test post test design was used. Questionnaires and semi structured interviews were conducted at baseline and again one year later to evaluate implementation, costs, and effectiveness of the intervention. Demographic data was also collected.
Findings:  Total median cost to implement the one year program was 3,128 pounds and 1,380 additional pounds for two year follow up and were considered reasonable. Results revealed that work participation improved significantly. After the intervention 8 of 12 were employed in a variety of jobs working 12 to 32 hours a week. However, the ratio of employed paid versus unpaid was 4 to 4. Notably the majority of participants had moderate to severe physical disability and some had low educational levels.
Conclusions:  Preliminary findings indicate that the intervention may be able to improve work participation among young adults with physical disabilities.

Disabilities served:  Cerebral palsy
Multiple sclerosis
Spinal cord injury (SCI)
Traumatic brain injury (TBI)
Severe physical disability
Populations served:  Gender: Female and Male
Other
Interventions:  Vocational rehabilitation
Other
Outcomes:  Other