Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Webster, J.B., Poorman, C.E., Cifu, D.X. (2014). Department of Veterans Affairs amputation system of care: 5 years of accomplishments and outcomes. Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, 51 (4), 7-16.
Title:  Department of Veterans Affairs amputation system of care: 5 years of accomplishments and outcomes
Authors:  Webster, J.B., Poorman, C.E., Cifu, D.X.
Year:  2014
Journal/Publication:  Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development
Publisher: 
Full text:  http://www.rehab.research.va.gov/jour/2014/514/pdf/jrrd-2014-01-002...   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  No

Structured abstract:

Background:  The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has always placed a high priority on caring for veterans that have experienced a limb amputation. Legislation such as the Veterans Medical Programs Amendments in 1992 and Veterans Health Care Eligibility Act in 1996 have put that commitment down into law. In 2008 the VA launched the Amputation System of Care (ASoC) in order to provide quality and consistent care to veterans with limb loss. The driving force behind ASoC was to provide lifelong care to Iraq and Afghanistan veterans with limb loss and also veterans with limb loss due to diabetes and peripheral vascular disease.
Purpose:  The purpose of this paper is to highlight the accomplishments and outcomes of the ASoC.
Findings:  The ASoC is a national health care delivery system that cares for veterans with limb amputations for the duration of their lives. The program has expanded significantly since its launch in 2008. Amputations do not have to be combat related-the ASoC serves veterans and service members that receive amputations from any etiology. Twenty one of the 22 ASoC facilities in the country have received accreditation from The Commission for Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF). Accreditation from CARF adds legitimacy and shows the level of distinguished care that ASoC provides. The ASoC has collaborated with the Department of Defense in developing best practice guidelines. Support groups for caregivers and a database have also been established.
Conclusions:  The ASoC has already evolved significantly since its inception and is well positioned to be a leader in amputation care.

Populations served:  Veterans