Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Bishop, M., Frain, M., Rumrill, P., & Rymond, C. (2009). The relationship of self-management and disease-modifying therapy use to employment status among adults with multiple sclerosis. Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, 31 (2), 119-128.
Title:  The relationship of self-management and disease-modifying therapy use to employment status among adults with multiple sclerosis
Authors:  Bishop, M., Frain, M., Rumrill, P., & Rymond, C.
Year:  2009
Journal/Publication:  Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation
Publisher:  IOS Press
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.3233/JVR-2009-480
Full text:  https://content.iospress.com/articles/journal-of-vocational-rehabil...   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  No
Research design:  Survey research

Structured abstract:

Background:  Many barriers to employment have been extensively studied among individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). Demographic and disease related variables have been found to impact employment status but self-management and adherence to disease modifying therapy have not been extensively studied.
Purpose:  The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between self-management and the use of disease modifying therapy and employment status.
Study sample:  The sample consisted of 175 adults with MS. Most of the sample was female and Caucasian. About 41% of the sample was working full time and over 98% of the participants completed high school.
Control or comparison condition:  Employment outcome was the comparison condition.
Data collection and analysis:  Data was collected through surveys which contained demographic information, MS information, and questions about treatment and self-management. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to evaluate the target relationships.
Findings:  Higher age, more years with MS, and higher self-management scores were positively related to employment.
Conclusions:  These results suggest use of disease modifying therapy and self-management are significant factors in determining employment status.

Disabilities served:  Multiple sclerosis
Outcomes:  Employment acquisition