Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Anderson, C.J., Vogel, L.C. (2002). Employment outcomes of adults who sustained spinal cord injuries as children or adolescents. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 83 (6), 791-801.
Title:  Employment outcomes of adults who sustained spinal cord injuries as children or adolescents
Authors:  Anderson, C.J., Vogel, L.C.
Year:  2002
Journal/Publication:  Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Publisher:  American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1053/apmr.2002.32742
Full text:  http://proxy.library.vcu.edu/login?url=http://ac.els-cdn.com/S00039...   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  No
Research design:  Survey research

Structured abstract:

Background:  Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating injury that impacts all areas of an individual’s life. Employment is among the most areas of life for an adult and one that is often negatively impacted by SCI. Employment rates for individuals with SCI are dismally low. Much research has focused on adults with SCI that sustained the injury as an adult and likely had prior work history. Little research has looked at the employment outcomes of adults with SCI who sustained the injury as children or adolescents.
Purpose:  To examine the employment outcomes of adults with SCI who sustained the injury as children or adolescents.
Study sample:  A total of 195 participants from the United States and Canada took part in this study. All participants sustained the SCI at age 18 or younger and were at least 24 years old at the time of the study. The participants had been living with the SCI for a mean of 15 years.
Control or comparison condition:  Employment outcome was the comparison condition.
Data collection and analysis:  Data was collected through various means: A structured questionnaire, American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale, A functional limitations assessment, a community integration measure, and a life satisfaction scale. Logistic employment status was used to predict employment.
Findings:  Fifty-one percent of the participants were employed. Education, community mobility, functional independence, and decreased medical complications were all associated with employment.
Conclusions:  The very high rate of unemployment among adults with pediatric onset SCI is a concern. The factors associated with employment should provide guidelines to structuring interventions.

Disabilities served:  Spinal cord injury (SCI)
Outcomes:  Employment acquisition