Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Lindsay, S., McDougall, C., Menna-Dack, D., Sanford, R., Adams, T. (2014). An ecological approach to understanding barriers to employment for youth with disabilities compared to their typically developing peers: Views of youth, employers, and job counselors. Disability and Rehabilitation, 11 1-11.
Title:  An ecological approach to understanding barriers to employment for youth with disabilities compared to their typically developing peers: Views of youth, employers, and job counselors
Authors:  Lindsay, S., McDougall, C., Menna-Dack, D., Sanford, R., Adams, T.
Year:  2014
Journal/Publication:  Disability and Rehabilitation
Publisher:  Informa UK
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.3109/09638288.2014.939775
Full text:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25014127   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  No
Research design:  Qualitative research

Structured abstract:

Background:  Individuals with disabilities are a chronically underrepresented group in the workforce. While much research has focused on the barriers that adults with disabilities face little research has looked at the barriers that youth with disabilities encounter.
Purpose:  The purpose of this study was to examine the barriers that youth with disabilities encounter when trying to find employment as compared to their typically developing peers.
Setting:  Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Study sample:  The study sample consists of 31 youths (15 with a disability and 16 typically developing) and 19 employers and job counselors that are knowledgeable about youth employment.
Data collection and analysis:  Data was collected through qualitative interviews of each participant. Interviews were semi-structured and all focused on challenges that the youth encountered when finding and maintaining employment.
Findings:  Due to different attitudes and expectations of the youth with disabilities only half of them were looking for work as compared to their typically developing peers. Social networks and lack of life skills were barriers to employment for youth with disabilities. Systems level barriers impeded employers from hiring more youth with disabilities.
Conclusions:  Barriers to employment for youth with disabilities exist in many different places. In order to reduce and even eliminate these barriers the coordinated efforts of every invested party are necessary.

Populations served:  Transition-age youth (14 - 24)