Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Arango-Lasprilla, J.C., Ketchum, J.M., Francis, K., Lewis, A., Permuda, P., Wehman, P., & Kreutzer, J. (2010). Race, ethnicity, and employment outcomes 1, 5, and 10 years after spinal cord injury: A longitudinal analysis. Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 2 (10), 901-910.
Title:  Race, ethnicity, and employment outcomes 1, 5, and 10 years after spinal cord injury: A longitudinal analysis
Authors:  Arango-Lasprilla, J.C., Ketchum, J.M., Francis, K., Lewis, A., Permuda, P., Wehman, P., & Kreutzer, J.
Year:  2010
Journal/Publication:  Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Publisher:  American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pmrj.2010.05.009
Full text:  http://proxy.library.vcu.edu/login?url=http://ac.els-cdn.com/S19341...   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Yes
Research design:  Database mining

Structured abstract:

Background:  Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a traumatic injury with wide reaching effects on the lives of individuals living with it. One of the most impacted areas after SCI is employment-individuals living with SCI have dismal employment rates. Research has shown that race and ethnicity are related to employment outcomes after SCI.
Purpose:  The purpose of this study was to compare the employment outcomes of Caucasians, African Americans, and Hispanics with SCI at 1,5, and 10 years following the injury.
Study sample:  Participants consisted of 11,090 individuals living with SCI that were enrolled in the National Spinal Cord Injury Statistical Center database (NSCISC). There were 7735 Caucasians, 2381 African Americans, and 974 Hispanics all between ages 18-55.
Control or comparison condition:  Employment outcome was the comparison condition.
Data collection and analysis:  Data was extracted from the NSCISC database. A repeated measures logistic regression analysis was used to examine the variables of interest.
Findings:  Caucasians had the greatest odds of being competitively employed of all the groups at 1, 5, and 10 years after SCI. At 10 years Hispanics had greater odds of being competitively employed than African Americans. All groups had greater odds of being competitively employed over time.
Conclusions:  Vocational rehabilitation professionals should pay particular attention to improving employment outcomes for Hispanics and African Americans living with SCI.

Disabilities served:  Spinal cord injury (SCI)
Populations served:  Race: Black / African American
Race: White / Caucasian
Ethnicity: Hispanic or Latino
Outcomes:  Employment acquisition