Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Schoen, B.A., Leahy, M.J. (2012). An analysis of the changing demographics of individuals with spinal cord injury who received state vocational rehabilitation services between 2004 and 2008. Journal of Rehabilitation, 78 (3), 11-19.
Title:  An analysis of the changing demographics of individuals with spinal cord injury who received state vocational rehabilitation services between 2004 and 2008
Authors:  Schoen, B.A., Leahy, M.J.
Year:  2012
Journal/Publication:  Journal of Rehabilitation
Publisher: 
Full text:  http://proxy.library.vcu.edu/login?url=http://connection.ebscohost....   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  No
Research design:  Database mining

Structured abstract:

Background:  Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a traumatic and complex disability. In recent years statistics have suggested that the demographic of individuals living with SCI has changed with Caucasians decreasing, while African Americans and Hispanics have increased. Employment for individuals with SCI is important as it can offset some of the costs associated with it and improve overall quality of life. Vocational rehabilitation services (VR) serve many of these individuals in their attempts to return to paid employment. It is important for these service providers to be aware of demographic changes over time in their populations.
Purpose:  The purpose of this study was to examine the changing demographics of individuals with SCI that used VR services between 2004-2008.
Study sample:  The sample consists of individuals with SCI who received VR services between 2004 and 2008. The sample of 23,135 participants includes 15,032 men and 8,103 women. The majority of the population was Caucasian (70.2%), followed by African American (17%), and Hispanic and Latino 8.8%.
Data collection and analysis:  Data was taken from the Rehabilitation Services Administration database (RSA-911). Univariate measures, cross tabulations, and chi-square analyses were used to analyze differences in demographics.
Findings:  There was an overall decline in the number of individuals with SCI served by state VR agencies between 2004-2008. Women with SCI served by state VR agencies exceeded the general population of women with SCI. African Americans that used VR services trailed the general population of African Americans with SCI.
Conclusions:  An awareness of these changes in demographics of those with SCI utilizing VR services will be helpful in designing outreach efforts and interventions.

Disabilities served:  Spinal cord injury (SCI)