Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Botticello, A.L., Chen, Y., Tulsky, D.S. (2012). Geographic variation in participation for physically disabled adults: The contribution of area economic factors to employment after spinal cord injury. Social Science & Medicine, 75 (8), 1505-1513.
Title:  Geographic variation in participation for physically disabled adults: The contribution of area economic factors to employment after spinal cord injury
Authors:  Botticello, A.L., Chen, Y., Tulsky, D.S.
Year:  2012
Journal/Publication:  Social Science & Medicine
Publisher:  Elsevier
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.06.010
Full text:  http://proxy.library.vcu.edu/login?url=http://www.sciencedirect.com...   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Yes
Research design:  Database mining

Structured abstract:

Background:  Despite the efforts to eliminate barriers to employment for individuals with disabilities they continue to be woefully underrepresented in the American workforce. Much of the research in the area has focused on accessibility and employer attitude issues. Very little research has been devoted to employment outcomes based on where an individual with a disability lives. This particular study chose to examine individuals living with spinal cord injury (SCI).
Purpose:  The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of economic differences across geographic areas on the employment outcomes of adults with SCI.
Study sample:  A final sample of 1013 individuals living with SCI was extracted from the National Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems (SCIMS) database. All individuals met the following criteria: (1) 18 years or older when injured; (2) participant in SCIMS follow ups in New Jersey or Alabama; (3) Completed at least one follow-up interview between 2000-2009.
Control or comparison condition:  Employment outcome was the comparison condition
Data collection and analysis:  Data was extracted from the SCIMS database. Hierarchal generalized linear modeling was used to estimate the influence of area economic indicators on employment likelihood.
Findings:  The likelihood of employment varied by area and an area with a higher SES that was more urban increased the likelihood of employment.
Conclusions:  Variation in area SES could affect the likelihood of employment for individuals with SCI.

Disabilities served:  Spinal cord injury (SCI)
Outcomes:  Employment acquisition
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