Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Hirsh, A.T., Molton, I.R., Johnson, K.L., Bombardier, C.H., & Jensen, M.P. (2009). The relationship of chronological age, age at injury, and duration of injury to employment status in individuals with spinal cord injury. Psychological Injury and Law, 2 (3), 263-275.
Title:  The relationship of chronological age, age at injury, and duration of injury to employment status in individuals with spinal cord injury
Authors:  Hirsh, A.T., Molton, I.R., Johnson, K.L., Bombardier, C.H., & Jensen, M.P.
Year:  2009
Journal/Publication:  Psychological Injury and Law
Publisher:  Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1007/s12207-009-9062-3
Full text:  http://proxy.library.vcu.edu/login?url=http://link.springer.com/art...   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Yes
Research design:  Survey research

Structured abstract:

Background:  Spinal cord injury (SCI) carries with it considerable costs in terms of treatment, care, and lost employment. Lost employment also leads to diminished quality of life. A number of age related factors have been found to be associated with employment outcomes following SCI. Younger chronological age and younger age at injury have been shown to lead to better employment outcomes. The longer a person has been living with SCI the more likely it is that person will be employed. Further investigation of these age related variables must control for each one in subject groups.
Purpose:  The purpose of this study is to explore the importance of chronological age, age at injury, and duration of injury on employment following SCI.
Study sample:  All participants (N=620) self-reported a SCI and were at least 18 years of age.
Control or comparison condition:  Employment status was the comparison condition.
Data collection and analysis:  All participants filled out a survey that assessed demographic variables, chronological age, age at injury, duration of injury, employment status, and measures of physical and psychological function. A series of regression analyses were done to assess the target variables.
Findings:  Chronological age and age at injury were significant predictors of employment status. Significantly more participants aged 45-54 were employed than those aged 55-64.
Conclusions:  These findings suggest that chronological age and age at injury onset are significant predictors of employment status but injury duration is not. The mid 50s are a risky time for individuals with SCI and their employment status.

Disabilities served:  Spinal cord injury (SCI)
Outcomes:  Employment acquisition