Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Mank, D., Cioffi, A., & Yovanoff, P. (2003). Supported employment outcomes across a decade: Is there evidence of improvement in the quality of implementation?. Mental Retardation, 41 (3), 188-197.
Title:  Supported employment outcomes across a decade: Is there evidence of improvement in the quality of implementation?
Authors:  Mank, D., Cioffi, A., & Yovanoff, P.
Year:  2003
Journal/Publication:  Mental Retardation
Publisher:  American Association on Mental Retardation
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1352/0047-6765(2003)41<188:SEOAAD>2.0.CO;2
Full text:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12737612   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  No
Research design:  Survey research

Structured abstract:

Background:  Supported employment has made great strides into integrating people with developmental disabilities into competitive employment. Supported employment works with both the employer and the employee to tailor the job to the individual’s ability and sustain employment. Despite continued progress of supported employment since the early days of the 1980s room for improvement remains.
Purpose:  The purpose of this article was to examine supported employment outcomes from the early 1990s and the late 1990s to look for evidence of improvement.
Study sample:  Thirteen vocational programs in Oregon, California, Colorado, Missouri, New York, Pennsylvania, Washington, and Virginia.
Control or comparison condition:  Employment outcome was the comparison condition
Data collection and analysis:  A survey was developed that asked questions about employment outcomes and features of supported employment among individuals served by vocational programs. The first round of the survey was sent to vocational programs in July 1995, the second round in November 1996, and the final round in March 1999. Summary analysis was used to describe the data and chi square analysis was used to separate the independent variable (year) from other information.
Findings:  Employees hired in 1995 or later were more likely to receive weekly support. Employees hired in 1995 or later were more likely to be with an employer that offers disability awareness training. People hired in 1995 or later were more likely to be working in an integrated workplace.
Conclusions:  This data suggests that there is little change in wages or hours worked from the early 1990s to the late 1990s. There has been significant improvement in hiring of individuals with disabilities and training of employers and coworkers however.

Interventions:  Supported employment