Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Jackson, M. N., Meade, M. A., Ellenborgen, P., Barrett, K. (2006). Perspectives on networking, cultural values, and skills among African American men with Spinal Cord Injury: A reconsideration of social capital theory. Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, 25 (1), 21-33.
Title:  Perspectives on networking, cultural values, and skills among African American men with Spinal Cord Injury: A reconsideration of social capital theory
Authors:  Jackson, M. N., Meade, M. A., Ellenborgen, P., Barrett, K.
Year:  2006
Journal/Publication:  Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation
Publisher:  IOS Press
Full text:  https://content.iospress.com/articles/journal-of-vocational-rehabil...   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  No
Research design:  Qualitative research

Structured abstract:

Background:  High unemployment rates have been shown in research among persons with Spinal Cord Injury (SCI). The unemployment rate is even higher among African Americans with SCI. When severity of injury is controlled for a lack of “social capital” is one factor accounting for the disparities in unemployment rates. Social capital is associated with possession of cultural values, education, experience, and training.
Purpose:  The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of African American men with SCI towards work.
Setting:  Focus groups and interviews of persons with SCI in Virginia.
Study sample:  Thirty-seven African Americans with SCI.
Intervention:  Individual interviews and focus groups
Data collection and analysis:  All interviews were audio-taped and transcribed
Findings:  The social capital of the men in this study was valuable primarily for social and emotional support and had little translation into employment opportunities.
Conclusions:  State agencies appear to be inconsistent in how much they have helped these African American men with SCI. Vocational rehabilitation counselors should be aware of the challenges this population group faces.

Disabilities served:  Spinal cord injury (SCI)
Populations served:  Gender: Male
Race: Black / African American
Interventions:  Vocational rehabilitation