Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Chan, F., Strauser, D., Gervey, R., & Lee, E.J. (2010). Introduction to demand-side factors related to employment of people with chronic illness and disability. Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation, 20 (4), 407-411.
Title:  Introduction to demand-side factors related to employment of people with chronic illness and disability
Authors:  Chan, F., Strauser, D., Gervey, R., & Lee, E.J.
Year:  2010
Journal/Publication:  Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation
Publisher:  Springer Science + Business Media, LLC
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10926-010-9243-7
Full text:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20535535   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Yes
Research design:  Literature review

Structured abstract:

Background:  Supply-side employment models related to people with chronic illness and disability have lost effectiveness in the current harsh economic climate. Demand-side models that focus on employer needs are becoming increasingly important as a research topic and can boost employment outcomes of people with chronic illness and disability.
Purpose:  This special section is intended to stimulate discussion about incorporating demand side strategies into vocational rehabilitation.
Setting:  The studies in the review of literature took place in various types of settings.
Study sample:  The sample size of the studies in the review of literature varied.
Intervention:  In this paper the authors discuss the relationship between employer practice factors and the hiring of people with chronic illness and disability. Research in demand-side employment and disability research is also highlighted.
Control or comparison condition:  There was no control or comparison condition in this study.
Findings:  Employer misconceptions about hiring people with disabilities and chronic illness still exist. Managers may not have adequate training on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). There is a gap between employers who report intentions to hire people with disabilities and employers that actually do it.
Conclusions:  It was the hope of the authors that this special section on demand-side vocational rehabilitation strategies would be thought provoking and stimulate discussion.

Populations served:  Gender: Female and Male
Race: American Indian or Alaska Native
Race: Asian
Race: Black / African American
Race: White / Caucasian
Race: Native Hawaiian / other Pacific Islander