Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Chapin, M., Miller, S., Ferrin, J.M., Chan, F., & Rubin, S.E. (2004). Psychometric validation of a subjective well-being measure for people with spinal cord injuries. Disability and Rehabilitation, 26 (19), 1135-1142.
Title:  Psychometric validation of a subjective well-being measure for people with spinal cord injuries
Authors:  Chapin, M., Miller, S., Ferrin, J.M., Chan, F., & Rubin, S.E.
Year:  2004
Journal/Publication:  Disability and Rehabilitation
Publisher:  Taylor & Francis Ltd
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1080/09638280410001714772
Full text:  http://proxy.library.vcu.edu/login?url=http://informahealthcare.com...   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Yes
Research design:  Survey research

Structured abstract:

Background:  Work rehabilitation counseling has usually been measured by employment outcomes. Professionals in the field have been advocating for quality of life measures to be included in rehabilitation outcomes. When looked at objectively in terms of employment outcomes disabled people have reported a lower quality of life than able bodied individuals. When looked at in more subjective measures of self-reported life satisfaction disabled people have reported a quality of life equal to that of able bodied individuals. The Sense of Well Being Inventory (SWBI) was recently developed in order to measure quality of life in individuals with disabilities in work rehabilitation programs in the United States. The SWBI has yet to be validated on spinal cord injury (SCI) population groups.
Purpose:  There is a lack of psychometrically sound quality of life (QOL) instruments for use with people with SCI. The purpose of this study was to refine and validate the use of the SWBI with a study sample with SCI.
Setting:  Participants were recruited from Alberta, Saskatchewan, Nova Scotia, and Manitoba chapters of the Canadian Paraplegic Association.
Study sample:  The participants (N=132) had a mean age of 45.82 years and were 77% male. Sixty-one percent of the participants had at least a high school education. The participants averaged 15.21 months since SCI onset. Sixty-seven percent of the participants were unemployed at the time of the study.
Control or comparison condition:  A brief version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF) was used as a control for the SWBI.
Data collection and analysis:  All participants completed the SWBI, demographic information, and the WHOQOL-BREF. Factor analysis was done to determine items that would be included in the final SWBI instrument.
Findings:  Factor analysis yielded four factors: Psychological well-being, financial well-being, social and family well-being, and physical well-being. These factors were similar to the original SWBI and correlated well with the WHOQOL-BREF.
Conclusions:  The validity of the SWBI was supported and this research suggests its usefulness in the SCI community.

Disabilities served:  Spinal cord injury (SCI)
Outcomes:  Other