Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Krause, J.S., Terza, J.V., Erten, M., Focht, K.L., & Dismuke, C.E. (2012). Prediction of post-injury employment and percentage of time worked after spinal cord injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 92 (2), 373-375.
Title:  Prediction of post-injury employment and percentage of time worked after spinal cord injury
Authors:  Krause, J.S., Terza, J.V., Erten, M., Focht, K.L., & Dismuke, C.E.
Year:  2012
Journal/Publication:  Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Publisher:  American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2011.09.006
Full text:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22289252   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Yes
Research design:  Survey research

Structured abstract:

Background:  For every two people who are able to obtain work after a spinal cord injury (SCI) there is a third that cannot maintain employment. Demographic factors, severity of the injury, and occupational characteristics all determine the probability of post injury employment. This study aims to use these factors to predict post injury employment.
Purpose:  The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with post injury employment.
Setting:  Data was collected from three hospitals in the Midwestern and Southeastern United States.
Study sample:  All participants came from three hospitals in the Midwestern and Southeastern United States. The participants (N=1,329) were all over the age of 18, had a traumatic SCI, and were at least one year post injury.
Control or comparison condition:  Post SCI employment was the comparison condition
Data collection and analysis:  The Life Situation Questionnaire-Revised was used to determine employment status following the SCI. Demographic data was also collected in order to use as a predictor to obtaining employment after SCI.
Findings:  The less severe the injury the more that was worked post injury. Obtaining a college degree post injury or before injury was associated with a greater chance of being employed. Being a white male and having worked in the service industry were also associated with more time working.
Conclusions:  The benefits of both pre and post injury education cannot be underestimated by vocational rehabilitation counselors.

Disabilities served:  Spinal cord injury (SCI)
Outcomes:  Employment acquisition