Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Krause, J.S., & Ricks, J.M. (2012). Stability of vocational interests after recent Spinal Cord Injury: Comparisons related to sex and race. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 93 (4), 588-596.
Title:  Stability of vocational interests after recent Spinal Cord Injury: Comparisons related to sex and race
Authors:  Krause, J.S., & Ricks, J.M.
Year:  2012
Journal/Publication:  Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Publisher:  American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2011.11.003
Full text:  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003999311009555   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Yes
Research design:  Associational research

Structured abstract:

Background:  Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) can impede the ability to perform many functions from basic lifestyle activities to employment tasks. Vocational interests are measurable using a variety of assessments. Since SCI can impede the ability to perform vocational tasks interests may change after SCI but are usually highly resistant to change. For example those with vocational interests involving physical tasks may not be able to perform those tasks after SCI. Diverse patters of interest have been observed in SCI patients of various races and sexes. There is not a longitudinal study to examine the stability of vocational interests across different races and sexes.
Purpose:  This study aims to identify the stability of vocational interests broken down across different races and sexes.
Setting:  Vocational interest data was collected at a SCI specialty hospital in the Southeastern United States
Study sample:  Participants initially enrolled between 2002 and 2006 at a SCI specialty hospital. All participants (N=304) were either white or black and of non-Hispanic origin as a condition of the study. White men numbered 55.6% of the participants, white women 27.1%, black men 18.1%, and black women 4.6%. All participants were at least 16 years of age and within their first six months of the SCI. Vocational interests of all participants were initially assessed and then assessed again an average of 785 days after the initial assessment.
Control or comparison condition:  The results of different cohort groups based on race and sex were compared.
Data collection and analysis:  Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the results of the vocational interest profiles. A repeated measures general linear model was used to analyze changes in the vocational interest profiles over time. Four cohort groups were formed based on the combination of race and sex and results were compared across the cohort groups.
Findings:  Black women showed decreases in vocational interest scores over time. Other groups showed increases in interest scores and also merged towards being more homogenous in their interests over time.
Conclusions:  Changes in vocational interest scores were related to sex and race. Additional research should focus on studying changes over a longer period of time and including more groups other than white and black non-Hispanics.

Disabilities served:  Spinal cord injury (SCI)
Populations served:  Gender: Female and Male
Race: Black / African American
Race: White / Caucasian
Ethnicity: Not Hispanic or Latino