Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Hall, J., Morgan, R. L., & Salzberg, C.L. (2014). Job-preference and job-matching assessment results and their association with job performance and satisfaction among young adults with developmental disabilities. Education and Training in Autism and Developmental Disabilities, 49 (2), 301-312.
Title:  Job-preference and job-matching assessment results and their association with job performance and satisfaction among young adults with developmental disabilities
Authors:  Hall, J., Morgan, R. L., & Salzberg, C.L.
Year:  2014
Journal/Publication:  Education and Training in Autism and Developmental Disabilities
Publisher:  Division on Autism and Developmental Disabilities
Full text:  http://www.jstor.org/stable/23880612?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  No
Research design:  Quasi-experimental

Structured abstract:

Background:  Self determination of employment for adults with developmental disabilities is a primary factor in empowering them to be the primary causal agents of their own futures. Past research has shown that working in a chosen job increased productivity and satisfaction for these individuals. Self determination can be enhanced through the use of job matching services available on the Internet. However, there is little research to determine whether productivity and satisfaction is increased in high preference, high match jobs versus low preference, low match jobs in individuals with developmental disabilities.
Purpose:  This study aims to determine whether level of preference and degree of match for a job has any association with job performance and satisfaction in young adults with developmental disabilities.
Setting:  The participants completed an Internet based job preference assessment in a familiar setting. A job coach familiar with the participants completed the job matching assessment. Participants worked in community settings such as (a) a supermarket deli; (b) a carpentry shop in a strip mall; (c) a Mexican restaurant; (d) an electronics lab in a technical college; (e) an elementary school library; and (f) a dining room in an assisted living center.
Study sample:  Four young adults with developmental disabilities. Two males and two females ages 19-20.
Intervention:  The participants worked for 30 minutes each in a high preference, high match job and a low preference, low match job for five days per week for two weeks. Productivity and satisfaction at each work site every day were measured and recorded.
Control or comparison condition:  Each participant worked a high preference, high match job and a low preference, low match job. Productivity and satisfaction at high preference, high match sites were compared with productivity and satisfaction at low preference, low match sites.
Data collection and analysis:  Productivity at each site was measured by taking the number of tasks completed divided by the number of tasks completed by a typical adult employee and multiplied by 100. Accuracy of completed tasks was measured by taking the number of tasks successfully completed in a set amount of time divided by total number of tasks completed and multiplied by 100. Trend function lines were reported for each measure. Satisfaction was measured by taking the number of sessions that the high performance, high match job was the better liked job divided by the total number of sessions offered.
Findings:  All participants showed higher productivity, accuracy, and satisfaction at the high preference, high match jobs.
Conclusions:  This research suggests that high performance, high match jobs generally lead to greater satisfaction and productivity among individuals with developmental disabilities. The use of only four participants was a limitation to this study so generalization of the results to larger populations is limited. Future research should focus on longitudinal studies that can determine job satisfaction and performance over weeks or months on the job.

Disabilities served:  Autism / ASD
Developmental disabilities
Interventions:  Job search and placement assistance
Vocational assessment