Article Details

Research Database: Article Details

Citation:  Cook, J.A., Blyler, C.R., Leff, H.S., McFarlane, W.R.,Goldberg, R.W., Gold, P.B., Mueser, K.T., Shafer, M.S., Onken, S.J., Donegan, K., Carey, M.A., Kaufmann, C., & Razzano, L.A. (2008). The Employment Intervention Demonstration program: Major findings and policy implications. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, 31 (4), 291-295.
Title:  The Employment Intervention Demonstration program: Major findings and policy implications
Authors:  Cook, J.A., Blyler, C.R., Leff, H.S., McFarlane, W.R.,Goldberg, R.W., Gold, P.B., Mueser, K.T., Shafer, M.S., Onken, S.J., Donegan, K., Carey, M.A., Kaufmann, C., & Razzano, L.A.
Year:  2008
Journal/Publication:  Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal
Publisher:  American Psychological Association
DOI:  https://doi.org/10.2975/31.4.2008.291.295
Full text:  http://psycnet.apa.org/record/2008-05200-005    |   PDF   
Peer-reviewed?  Yes
NIDILRR-funded?  Yes
Research design:  Systematic review / meta-analysis

Structured abstract:

Background:  The Employment Intervention Demonstration program was a "multi-center study designed to generate knowledge about effective approaches for enhancing employment among adults with severe mental illnesses" (p. 291).
Purpose:  This article describes the study design, models tested, and study participants.
Setting:  This study is a systematic review. The included studies were undertaken in various locations and settings.
Study sample:  The study participants included 1273 people with chronic mental illness at seven sites.
Intervention:  Supported employment programs were implemented and followed for two years.
Control or comparison condition:  Control groups received services as usual.
Data collection and analysis:  This article summarizes findings of published articles about EIDP. "For preexisting models, fidelity was assessed via established measures; the EIDP also developed and administered a cross-site measure of adherence to supported employment principles and practices" (p. 292).
Findings:  Supported employment models were more effective than services as usual. In addition, Experimental condition subjects were more likely to be competitively employed (55% of experimental versus 34% of control participants), work 40 or more hours per month (51% versus 39%), and have higher earnings ($i22/month vs. $99/month) despite controlling for demographic, clinical, and work history confounds. And, the advantage that the experimental group clients had over the comparison group increased over time.
Conclusions:  Supported employment models are effective and their value increases over time, indicating that the effects achieved are sustainable. These models work in diverse settings, different geographical areas, and for a variety of clients.

Disabilities served:  Chronic mental illness
Populations served:  Gender: Female and Male
Race: Black / African American
Race: White / Caucasian
Ethnicity: Hispanic or Latino
Interventions:  Career counseling
Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model of supported employment
Job search and placement assistance
Psychological counseling
Post-employment services
Rehabilitation counseling
Supported employment
Vocational rehabilitation
Outcomes:  Employment acquisition